World War II Conflict Aviation Archaeology: Managing World War II Aviation Sites in Australia and the Marshall Islands

21st October 2014

Fiona Shanahan

Department of Archaeology, La Trobe University, BA(Hons), May 2014

During World War II (WWII) the Pacific witnessed a war like no other—an air war. Despite the significance of WWII aviation sites in the Pacific, few are formally managed or protected by current heritage legislation. This study investigated two case studies located in Australia’s Northern Territory (Darwin Harbour and Coomalie) and another two in the Marshall Islands (Jab’u Island and Taroa Island) in regards to current heritage legislation and management plans for WWII sites and artefacts. Implementation of heritage legislation for WWII sites in Australia and the Marshall Islands has undergone considerable change since the first heritage acts in 1991. However, the implementation of management plans has not advanced, with none of these four case studies officially managed. This thesis evaluates the importance of WWII aviation sites and the need for adequate legislation and management plans to ensure the survival of these sites.

Shanahan, F.
World War II Conflict Aviation Archaeology: Managing World War II Aviation Sites in Australia and the Marshall Islands
December 2014
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Thesis Abstracts
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